Underused Eco-Friendly Energy Sources

Underused Eco-Friendly Energy Sources

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As the world continues to be held hostage by its dependence upon fossil fuels, scientists and conservationists tirelessly pursue a solution to our energy needs that won’t compromise health, safety and the Earth itself. While progress seems slow, researchers have made a lot of headway in our journey toward finding a viable source of clean and environmentally safe energy. With global support for green living increasing and fossil fuel production decreasing, we can become the pioneers who gave our descendants a better world with plenty of low-cost, clean and renewable energy for all.

Biomass Energy

Derived from organic materials such as agricultural epiphenomena and forest residues, biomass is highly renewable. While burning this matter can generate carbon dioxide, scientists claim the levels are safe and have classed the process as a carbon neutral energy source, provided the plant matter used is continuously replaced.

Geothermal Energy

Idaho blazed a trail for this renewable energy source before any other state by harnessing the heat emitted from its geothermal hot springs. More research and development is needed before geothermal energy could replace fossil fuels, but the process already helps industries like agriculture, fish farming and space heating.

Tidal Energy

Approximately 70% of the Earth is covered in water under the gravitational pull of the moon, resulting in powerful tidal fluctuations. When we take advantage of this purely natural energy produced by the motion of the water around the globe, we can harness an almost unlimited supply of power. In France, tidal energy mills are already in use to grind cereals. Even better, there are nearly an unlimited array of options for harnessing energy from the ocean’s tidal activity.

Wave Power

Another way to get renewable energy from the seas is to harness wave activity for conversion into renewable electricity. For decades, the devices used to collect wave energy were merely prototypes, but recently commercial devices were put into place and achieved a great deal of success.

 

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